Turkey Spinach Omelets in a Mug

James and I have been on a mug kick lately. Well, technically we’ve been on a mug kick for decades, if you’re talking about our coffee obsession.

But that’s not what I’m talking about, Willis.

Microwave Spinach Omelets in a Mug


With just a microwave, a mug, and a bunch of tasty ingredients, you can actually make an entire meal, just like that. I’m pretty sure my attraction to cooking in a mug all stems from laziness. Mug cooking is faster, easier, and takes MUCH less time in the dreaded clean-up phase (insert “Hallelujiah” music). Plus, they’re all portioned out, so there can be no overeating. Well, unless you steal your spouse’s.

But that would be bad. Don’t do that.

Since James and I are especially lazy when it comes to mornings in the RV, microwave mug breakfasts are the bomb-diggity when on the road.

Microwave Spinach Omelets in a Mug Recipe


Anyway, I want you to know that I just now whipped up the omelets you see in these pictures. As I type, they’ve moved from mug to belly (happy belly), and are currently working their way through my digestive system. Is that TMI? Probably a little TMI, oh well. Since we’ve already established I can be lazy, rewriting that seems like too much work. And the good news is that omelet will fuel me on my jog once I’m done here. James is already off on his bike burning his omelet off, the over-achiever.

So let’s talk about this recipe. There are lots of different ways to make mug omelets, but this recipe is one of our favorites because it’s just so yummy.

Microwave Turkey Omelet Recipe


There’s a little-known secret to creating a creamy (yet still healthy) omelet. You know what it is?

Cottage Cheese.

I know, I know, many of you hate the stuff. The texture, the taste, you’d rather eat dirt. James is one of those anti-cottage cheezists. The first time I told him I was making omelets with the secret ingredient cottage cheese he wrinkled up his nose and said, “ewww.” Here’s the thing about it. When mixed in and cooked up, NO ONE WOULD GUESS IT’S IN THERE. So, you skeptics out there, don’t judge it till you try it. And once you do, make sure you imagine me saying, “told ya so!”

Also, can I just take a moment to rave about my love of eggs?

Microwave Healthy Omelets in a Mug


Eggs are one of the healthiest foods on the planet, gang. They’ve pretty much got a little of almost everything we need inside that shell. They’re also an excellent source of choline, which 90% of us aren’t getting enough of. Choline is a sadly under-discussed essential nutrient that is vital for cell function and absolutely critical when it comes to healthy growth and development. And don’t worry about the cholesterol in eggs. Turns out we had that wrong. Current research shows that eating eggs does not have adverse effects on cholesterol in the blood for the general population. Plus, eating eggs consistently raises levels of HDL (the “good”) cholesterol, which is linked to a reduced risk of many diseases. So eat up!


Turkey Spinach Omelets in a Mug Recipe



  • 1 teaspoon butter (to coat the inside of the mug)
  • 2 tablespoons cottage cheese
  • 2 eggs
  • 1⁄2 cup fresh spinach leaves, washed, dried and finely chopped
  • 1 slice smoked turkey diced into tiny pieces (2 tablespoons)
  • 1 tablespoon shredded sharp cheddar



  1. Microwave the butter directly in the mug until melted, and then brush it around to coat the inside of the mug.
  2. Add the cottage cheese and eggs. Whisk thoroughly.
  3. Stir in the spinach and turkey.
  4. Microwave for 2 minutes, and then add the shredded cheese.
  5. Microwave another 30 seconds, and for high powered microwaves, it should be done. If it still seems a little wet, continue to microwave in 30 second increments.
  6. Let cool a few minutes before eating.

Stefany Adinaro is an RVing fitness pro and is the self-proclaimed “better half” of the Fit RV website. While she loves her RV adventures, her favorite adventure is being “Mugga” to grandbabies Amelia and Eli. When she's not on the road, you can find her training clients in Salt Lake City, Utah.

    13 thoughts on “Turkey Spinach Omelets in a Mug

    1. Kathy Holcombe

      Famagogo gives this recipe a big thumbs up! Abby and Peter were pretty skeptical about the cottage cheese, but they are already talking about all the different variations of this great staple dish. I think there is an omlet throwdown in our future. Thanks for the great healthy breakfast idea!

      1. Stefany - Post author

        Kathy!!! I’m thrilled y’all liked the mug omelets and can’t wait to hear what creative variations you come up with. Hope to see you at the rally this summer and congrats on your new RV!

    2. Mike Lammens

      Very good, I’ve been doing a version of this using bell peppers (red and green) and couple of eggs. If I have zucchini squash I use that too. A tiny bit of milk. That’s it, except for a thin slice of Chedar on the top and some hot sauce. My wife loves it! And not much work. The cottage cheese is an intriguing idea and I will try it next time. Thanks for the recipe!

    3. CJ

      This looks so easy and yummy. My husband and I are really looking for easy ways to eat well in our travels in our little B and really have been enjoying all your blogs on heath, fitness and food recipes. Now looking to possibly go up to a B+ size and have been enjoying those reviews also!

      1. Stefany - Post author

        How exciting, CJ, shopping for a new RV! No matter what B+ you pick, this recipe will work great on the road. James and I both look forward to these omelets on RV trips! Happy shopping!

    4. Alain Roy

      A good source of choline is in jerusalem artichokes (or sunchokes, or topinambour’s). Cubed and pan fried like a side order of potatoes (but much healthier) would be a great complement to your omelet.

      1. Alain Roy

        Oup’s I think I mixed up choline with inuline. Sunchokes do have choline, though I’m not sure how much.

        1. Stefany - Post author

          Lol, Alain! Yup, sunchokes have high levels of inulin, which is a soluble & prebiotic dietary fiber. For those who don’t know, they’re a type of sunflower, and you eat the root bulb. In fact you’ve probably seen inulin marketed as a calorie-free sweetener, since it has a naturally sweet taste. But getting inulin from sunchokes instead of processed powder, much healthier! Love the idea of a side of sunchokes cooked up to go with the omelet, replacing more traditional breakfast potatoes or hashbrowns. I just might have to try that!

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