Winnebago Fuse 23A (Twin Bed) – Our Short Review


We continue to see more and more models of RV built on the Ford Transit chassis.  When we were at the RVIA show in Louisville, we got to take a quick peek at the second floor plan of the Winnebago Fuse, the 23A, which is a twin bed model.  We hit this one at the end of a very long day at the show, so it’s not our detailed review, but still enough to give you a sense of this new floor plan.

 

You may remember our first review of the Winnebago Fuse.  We got to take a corner bed model out for a “test camp”, and we loved it.  It was a lot more space than we’re used to in our Class B, but it wasn’t a lot more difficult to drive and maneuver.  (And not more difficult to keep fueled either.)  But as much as we loved that model, I think I like this twin bed floor plan even better for a few reasons.

The first being – even though this model has a slide, you do NOT need to deploy it to sleep.  That makes for much easier quick stops (think: Wal-Mart).  Also, this model had the Froli Sleep System, which we’ve come to know and love in our own Travato.  And finally, there’s the second table, which means everyone has space to set up and write blog posts while on the road.

(OK.  Maybe that’s not a big concern for everyone else, but it comes up with us quite a bit.)

Overall, we really liked this coach, and we’re glad to see more and more solid options coming out on the Ford Transit.

Check it out!

 



James is a former rocket scientist, a USA Cycling certified coach, and lifelong fitness buff. When he's not driving the RV, or modifying the RV (or - that one time - doing both at once), you can find him racing bicycles, or building furniture, or making music. In his spare time, he works for a large IT company.


    14 thoughts on “Winnebago Fuse 23A (Twin Bed) – Our Short Review

    1. Ron Hunt

      Not to belabor a point on the diesel vs gas, but am I correct
      that the sprinters have a low ccc compared to gas (i.e. Roadtrek gas class B)?

      Reply
      1. James - Post author

        Well, that depends on the chassis. Diesel is generally regarded to have a higher CCC than a similar gas chassis.
        The Sprinter has more CCC than a ProMaster or Transit chassis, for example.
        But there are some high-capacity gas chassis available, and if you want lots of capacity, it might make sense to look at them.
        I don’t know much about the Roadtrek product line, so I don’t know the specs on the different chassis they use.

        Reply
    2. Tom Morgan

      To Don and others concerned about LP gas generators:
      First my credentials: Decades ago my job responsibility was to convert gasoline engines over to LP fuel, as a fleet manager. So, now my learned opinion about generators…. LP fueled engines are maintenance free for four main reasons. 1st, the fuel is cleaner and burns clean without the hazard of monoxides being expelled or breathed inside the coach. 2nd, there is no sledging of the oils and fuel so the engine oil never gets burned or contaminated by the fuel, change it never or whenever. 3rd, the refueling doesn’t come with the dreaded road tax, therefore somewhat less expensive per gallon than gasoline – or refuel it from your bulk home LP tank at heating cost. 4th, the engine will reliably start in any temperature environment (no choke, etc).The conclusion: your LP generator will outlive your chassis engine. However, because the LP fuel / air mixture is at a constant ratio throughout the power curve, engines will run smoother although less efficient when requiring power with keeping the generator at a steady pace with your load demands. Hence, the noise issue in some cases. Hope this helps you understand the thinking behind the manufacturers design for LP fuel.

      Tom Morgan 2005 23′ coach house platinum owner.
      Concord, Ga. Yes, we live in the country here!

      Reply
    3. Jonathan Miller

      The beauty of the RV world is that they make models for all types of people. But for me I hate the twin beds, reminds me too much of the airport vans versus a motorhome. And also the LP generator is a deal breaker for me. I use my generator a lot…how else can you have a/c while underway? But it’s nice to see the new Ford chassis being used. Should help keep the prices down from compared to the Mercedes chassis.

      Reply
      1. James - Post author

        Like you said, different strokes… (For example, so far, the only hours we’ve put on our generator were just to exercise it.)
        But we agree with you that it’s nice to have some more chassis options besides just the Sprinter. Options are good!

        Reply
      2. Don

        When we did the financial case, the purchase price was about 30% less expensive than the View 24v we were looking at. Not quite apples to apples, but definitely much less expensive (but the view has a few more refined features). I am hoping for a similar savings on the maintenance between Ford and Mercedes as well.

        Don
        2017 Fuse 23a
        Tallahassee, Fl

        Reply
    4. Jim & Sheila Eshleman

      Not to be a downer because I like the Fuse a lot, but the big TV in the front appears to be in an unwatchable position (?) unless you break out some folding chairs. What is up with that?

      Reply
      1. James - Post author

        Hmmm. You know, we never look much at TVs in RVs, so we may have missed that. You may be right there… I suppose you could see it from the dinette if you looked over your shoulder, or maybe had the dinette spread out into a bed. I’d probably remove all that over the cab and try to figure out a way to put bikes up there, lol.

        Reply
      2. Don

        The TV is watchable from the couch. With the slide in or out the angle is OK and you can see it with your head turned. I am not sure I would want to watch a full length movie in that position, but it is not as bad as it looks.

        But I agree, the big TV is not much of a benefit. I sort of liked the Trend 23d TV in the bedroom being on an arm that you can point either to the beds or to the front depending on where you were at.

        One note on the big TV. It is 110v. The smaller TV by the beds is 12v. I wish they were both 12v since you have to plugged in or on generator to use it.

        We have used it on 2 of the 3 nights we have stayed in the coach. One of our children was laying/sleeping on the fold out couch watched TV before bed and that is the one that was visible. But when it is just me and my wife I think that it will probably just gather dust.

        If I was ordering a Fuse I don’t think I would have paid any extra for it, but I think that it is the standard TV and the one by the beds is optional. There is some nice storage behind it however.

        Don
        2017 Fuse 23a
        Tallahassee, FL

        Reply
      3. CJ

        Altho we really love this unit, definitely agree about the TV which could only be viewed from the sofa, not the front seat. The Winnebago Promaster Trend has a floor plan just like this, 23D, and in the front they have a sky light, which we prefer, with the television in the same place as the Fuse’s second one which would then spin around so you could see from the beds or all the front seats. Do really like this open concept floor plan. I also like the Promaster version where the driver’s seat turns also. We have a B now and are looking to possibly go up to a B+ and love the size and open feel of this unit.

        Reply
    5. Don

      I purchased the Fuse 23a about a month ago. I have been really happy so far. As you pointed out, the beds are great, plenty long for a person who is 6 foot and can be used without any setup, so a nap at a rest stop is A-OK.

      We have no prior experience to compare it to, but per my wife, it drives better than our F-250 crew cab pickup truck. I have gotten around 15mpg on our last couple of trips from Tallahassee to Orlando, but remember that is on flat ground in Florida, but it was at 70mph.

      So far, we think the floorpan is perfect for our needs. The bathroom in the back makes the coach feel much larger and airy than mid bath models.

      In addition to what James and Stephanie showed in the video, there is an outside storage bay under the slide-out. This is a great big win in my book putting the utility storage where it needs to be. The only downside, if it is one, is that the generator is noisy inside and is LP. If I were James it would probably be a easy project to quiet it down some, but I am not even close. I also wish it got its fuel off of the diesel tank. Since I do not know how much we are going to use the generator, I may be fretting about nothing.

      BTW- I want to thank James and Stephanie for their blog. The FitRV.com provided tons of information and advice to help us make our decision buying the Fuse.

      Don Pace
      2017 Fuse 23a
      Tallahassee, FL
      http://confusedrv.com

      Reply
      1. Stefany

        It’s so great to hear from an owner, Don! How fantastic you chose this Fuse as your very 1st RV. Love the name of your website, you really do have to go into the RV lifestyle with a sense of humor! I will definitely be checking it out and following along. 🙂 Happy travels!

        Reply
      2. CJ

        Congrats on your unit, we really love the look of this one inside and out. We have an Era now and are looking to possibly go up slightly in size and this is the perfect one that we have seen so far. We also like the Trend version but like the outside of this one better. Only thing is I think we may have the same size air conditioner? If that is the case, ours can struggle a little in very hot weather. Have you had a chance to use yours when it is very hot out? How does it work out for you. We do dry camp a lot.

        Reply
        1. Don

          I have not had a chance to test the air conditioner at anything over 85 degrees. It was keeping up fine then, but I have only had the unit a month and it has not gotten hot in Florida yet. It does have the nice thermostat controlled fan in the front roof that works very well.

          I would recommend getting in the unit with the generator running and see how you like the noise if you dry camp. Remember it is an LP generator which would seem to me to be a concern if I was dry camping a lot.

          The Trend has a gas generator. Downside is that it has a lower carrying capacity than the Fuse. Lots of tradeoffs, but nothing is perfect i guess.

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